Bridgetown Maps: Evolution

I’ve mentioned this before: I’ve been fascinated by maps since I was a kid.  My dad had put up nine US Geodetic Survey maps of the local North Quabbin area on the wall of his downtown office (he used it as reference, as he was a local reporter), and I would stare at the things for ages.  The topography lines helped me imagine what the areas I’ve never visited looked like.  When I did eventually visit those areas, my visual guesses were rarely far off the mark.  My fascination soon expanded to the roads I carved into the dirt in my side yard for my Hot Wheels, and by 9 or 10 I was drawing maps just for the fun of it.  They weren’t of anywhere in particular; I’d just make them up as I went along.  It became a relaxing way to pass the time for me.  And once I went to college, you’d see map doodling all over the margins.  I still do it to this day; if you see me in the audience at a con, leaning over and doodling, chances are I’m drawing a map while I’m listening to the panelists.

Bridgetown Central 1993
Artwork ©1993 Jon Chaisson

When I started the Vigil project in the winter of 1993, I knew map drawing would have to be part of the world building.  If not for the publication, at least for my own reference.  I had certain areas of Bridgetown laid out in my head, but I wanted to have a physical layout I could use.

I hadn’t quite gotten the hang of size and perspective in these early maps, but they at least gave me an idea of what the Sprawl looked like.

This first map to the left was drawn that winter, with a much smaller layout of the city (it’s more like a small city here than a big giant sprawl it ended up being), but certain parts of it remained to the end of the project: the gentle curve of Branden Hill Park (called Johnson Park here), Sachers River and its island (with Vigil’s island location laid out), and the major north-south highway splitting through the middle.

Bridgetown Central 1995
Artwork ©1995 Jon Chaisson

The Vigil project ended up more like a lot of world building than doing much actual prose writing (I think it had more to do with me trying to figure out what story I wanted to tell and how).  By the summer of 1995 I expanded the above map by taping the original to my apartment window, covering it with blank newsprint paper, and building it up.

The layout was still a bit wonky, but I was getting there.  The big circle in the lower right corner is the first visual suggestion of the Mirades Tower (called the Underwood Tower here — I think I originally wanted Jenn’s family to be tied do it but never expanded on that plot line).  I’m kind of fascinated by this one, because by that time I’d watched a lot of anime and wanted something like the GENOM Tower from Bubblegum Crisis.  I was well aware of security issues with major driving arteries going underneath this tower, but I thought it was kind of a neat idea anyway.

Mirades Tower Looking South
Artwork ©1998 Jon Chaisson

Come 1998, I was about halfway through writing The Phoenix Effect, and I had a much better idea of what Bridgetown looked like.  At first I had an idea to draw certain visuals, such as the one to the left here: a view of the Mirades Tower, lording over the entirety of the Sprawl (the circle of buildings is a reference to the initial awakening process that takes place at the start of the book…ie, the Ring of Fire).  I wasn’t too happy with the artwork though (mainly me being a perfectionist and being annoyed at how wonky the Tower looks here), but it did its job.    I even got a better idea of how wide the Sachers River needed to be.  In fact, looking at this now, I realize this is very similar to the view I have out Spare Oom window, looking across the mouth of the Golden Gate towards the Marin Headlands!

Bridgetown Central
Artwork ©1998 Jon Chaisson

Probably within a month or so after that above drawing, I drew what would end up being one of the official reference maps for Bridgetown, complete with the district boundaries.  I would refer to this one page constantly during the TPE revision and the major rewrite as the trilogy.  Very little has changed in Bridgetown since then.  A few street names have changed, and I still hadn’t quite gotten Sachers Island drawn correctly, but for the most part this can still be considered a semi-accurate reference map for all the stories that take place in this city.

Note: Also seen on this map are the rough points of the hrrah-sehdhyn attack that takes place in A Division of Souls.  I’d added these a few years after the original map was drawn and just before I wrote that scene so I could get the layout correct.

 

But wait, there’s more!

During the years I wrote the trilogy, I would often flesh out ideas during the slow hours at my Day Job at the candle warehouse.  My buddy Bruce would often make fun of me when I did this.  I’d snag a piece of scrap paper (or more to the point, the blank forms we used for the pallets we built) and commence with that day’s outlining for whatever I’d be writing later that evening.  Or I’d draw detailed maps, sometimes even working on certain sections of Bridgetown.

Branden Hill Park
Artwork ©2001 Jon Chaisson

Here’s a great example of that:  My favorite section of town Branden Hill Park, which had been a point of interest since the Vigil days (the original Vigil story starts at the northeast corner of the park).  This is probably the best example of what Bridgetown truly looks like in my head.  I even went so far as to draw subway lines, considering that subway kiosk in the park shows up multiple times in the trilogy.

Note: You can even see where I put Nehalé’s apartment (the HB in the top left corner, referring to his old name of Halley Brown).

I do like the idea that even though the trilogy takes place at least 300 years in the future, there really hasn’t been too much of a change in terms of street layout or architecture for that matter.  I used the reasoning that Europe still has some of its original medieval roads, not to mention architecture that’s been around for a few centuries.  Besides, I really wasn’t all that keen on using the SF trope of multi-level cities and mountains of detritus.  The Meraladians helped us get past that economical and ecological snag sometime ago.

Mirades Tower Park
Artwork ©2003 Jon Chaisson

And lastly, I wanted a general layout of what Mirades Tower Park looked like — it would be used as a major setting throughout the trilogy, and numerous scenes take place there in The Balance of Light, so I had to make sure I got it right.  I think this one definitely gets the dimensions correct, as the Tower really is that huge.  I also deliberately left the surrounding neighborhood empty…since this is the financial and governmental center of the city, the entire area would be filled with skyscrapers and business towers, so the map would really end up looking like a bunch of large squares inside a square grid of streets.

I’m sure I have more maps and building drawings lying around.  I know I’d made a rough sketch of what the Branden Hill ARU headquarters looked like (hint: one of those arty curvy buildings, but without all the bizarre useless angles).  I’ll have to scan more of them when I have the time.

All these drawings definitely helped me visualize Bridgetown as I was writing the stories that take place there.  Without them I’m sure I’d have gotten a lot of the directions and distances incorrect.  It also helped me narrow down the images I wanted for my book covers; I knew that they would have to be busy metropolises, though not necessarily with the dark cyberpunk attitude of Bladerunner.  Both A Division of Souls and The Balance of Light use Shutterstock pictures of Singapore, which is just about the right level of sprawling city I was looking for.

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s